15 Things to Know Before Going To Italy

Things to Know Before Going to Italy

Italy has long been on the top of many travelers list for decades. The country is majestically beautiful, has world-class food, and a spoken language that will instantly make you drool and fall in love.

I have had the pleasure of spending time there on a few different occasions, and I found that there are many things to know before going to Italy.


Things to Know Before Going To Italy


1. Italians Take Riposo Very Seriously

Riposo is Italy’s midday siesta. From 1-4 p.m. you can expect to find many shops and restaurants closed.

Italians like to take time in the afternoon to go home, have lunch, and relax with family before heading back out to do business again. Life before work, love it!

The Streets in Lucca

2. Plan to Eat Late

That being said, most restaurants won’t open until 7 or later. Plan your meals accordingly to avoid any hangry moods.


3. There is No Tipping, but…

Many restaurants have a cover charge called “coperto,” so unless specified as “no service charge” you may as well get used to having to pay a fee when you sit down at a restaurant.

This can be anywhere from 1 to 5 Euro, and no it is not just because you are a tourist. Italians and foreigners alike have to pay the charge to sit at the table. Read more of our tips on tipping in restaurants throughout Europe.

Perugia
The view near our Airbnb in Perugia. Here’s $40 for you to get your own apartment rental!

4. Your Salad Has a New Best Friend

And her name is Olive Oil! You will not find anything but olive oil and maybe some vinegar for your salad.

Not in a cafe, upscale restaurant, or a grocery store – trust me, it’s not there. Buh bye ranch dressing – hellllooo bikini season! Italy, my waistline is thanking you.

Florence

5. €1.30 is the Price for a Cappuccino. Period.

Cappuccinos and espressos are everywhere in Italy, and it’s WONDERFUL. Our day in Italy wasn’t complete unless we had about three cups of foamy goodness. Italy isn’t known to be the cheapest country, but espressos are meant for everyone and are therefore very affordable.

We usually pay €1.50 for a Cappuccino and €1 for espresso. Anything more than €1.50 and you are getting the straight up tourist fare.

Italian Coffee Guide

6. The WiFi is…Developing

For a developed nation, accessible WiFi in Italy is seriously lacking. In most of the Airbnb’s, hostels, and hotels we stayed at the WiFi was less than adequate. This surprised us, and then we found out that more than 30% of Italians have never been online. So 1999.

Sorrento Mill

7. The New Cafe Culture is Non-Existent

There are no Starbucks in Italy. Not surprising, and actually very endearing. This doesn’t bother me as I have come to hate that seductive green Siren, and tend to only use their facilities for a free bathroom in Europe.

However, we didn’t find any cafes in Italy where we could go sit and work on our computer. A simple concept that has become so popular back home is virtually non-existent in Italy. Perhaps this correlates to the developing WiFi. Hmm.

know before you go to Italy

8. “Ciao,” “Grazie,” and “Non-Capisco” Will Go a Long Way

The Italians are amicable and polite people, but I still found that learning a few words in their language will get you a long way. It’s easy too! “Ciao” can be used for hello and goodbye, “Grazie,” is used everywhere to give thanks, and when a local mistakenly make you out for an Italian say “Non-Capisco” (I don’t understand). Or just pick up an Italian language book! Read my full list of what to bring to Italy here.

Is Venice worth a visit

9. Always Validate Your Train and Bus Tickets

Just buying your tickets at the bus or train station is not enough. You must validate them at the little machines nearby to prove that you are using the ticket right then and there. Not doing so will result in a hefty fine and an unhappy inspector.

Italy

10. All Roads Lead to Rome

We found the best way to get to many Italian cities, was through Rome. Termini station in Rome is a major transport hub linking the rest of Italy. This became kind of a pain, as a lot of time we had no desire to pass back through the city just to head somewhere else.

However most trips to Italy will likely start in Rome, I would suggest taking at least three days to explore the city. It’s one of the oldest in the world and one I keep finding myself back in. To make the most out of your time you can get a “Skip the Line” three-hour tour into the Vatican, Sistine Chapel & St. Peter’s.

Book your tour here!

When in Rome

11. Get to Naples for the Best Pizza Pie

Hands down the best (and cheapest) pizzas are in Naples. It’s honestly worth making a trip to the city just for the €3.50 Margarita Pizzas. It may have ruined all future pizza for me, but bringing that perfect pizza to my lips just once was worth it.


12. Pickpocketers, Schmishmocketers

For a country that has two cities listed as the top 10 pickpocketing places in the world, we never once felt like our possessions were in danger. Maybe it’s the New York mentality in us, but we found Italy to be incredibly safe. Just use some common sense and try not to look like a complete tourist and there is nothing to worry about.

Exploring the Cinque Terre Trail

13. Throw Everything You Know About Italian Food Out the Window

Spaghetti bolognese is not everywhere and cannolis are only popular in Sicily, also you will never ever see pepperoni. Instead, you will find the real Italian staples like bruschetta al pomodoro, delicious prosciutto layering a pizza, and spaghetti alla carbonara instead of fettucini alfredo. And the cheese!

Oh, don’t even get me started on the cheese in Italy. It’s delicious and fresh and nothing in your average supermarkets will ever compare. I worked at the American restaurant food chain Carrabba’s Italian Grill for 4 years. Trust me, the “Italian” food we think we know doesn’t even compare.

Cheese in Venice

14. Choose Your Gelato Wisely

There is good gelato and crap gelato – even in Italy. Read your reviews online, and be sure to test out a few different shops. When you find the best, you will know. Our favorite gelato in Italy was hands down in Florence and was called Gelateria Della Passera.

Gelato in Venice

15. Italy is a Vast and Varied Country (So, Bring a Camera)

Italy is so utterly different from north to south. There are 20 different regions in Italy, and each specializes in various wines, foods, and traditions. It’s impressive how one country can be the same but also so different. Rome and Florence are great cities, but there is much more to explore the boot-shaped country! I’ve spent a total of five months in Italy, and there is still so much left I have to see. If it’s your first time to Italy and you have a few weeks, here is an excellent suggested itinerary.

I never leave my Airbnb, hotel, or guesthouse without a camera so that I can collect all the memories of the beautiful country. I am currently traveling with a Fujifilm X-T3 and love it because for its small, stylish, and lightweight frame – perfect for Italy! You can see some of our favorite travel cameras here.

Trentino - Passo Tonale

Transport To and Around Italy


Getting to Italy has never been cheaper with budget airlines such as RyanAir operating out of many Italian cities. If you are flying from a different continent the main hubs are Rome, Florence, and Milan.

Once in Italy, the best way to get around is via train. For long-distance routes, it’s best to book beforehand with Trenitalia and reserve a seat. If you are traveling shorter distances it’s also possible to show up at the train station a buy a ticket there. Or get around Europe with a Eurail.

We’ve rented a car numerous times in Italy and it’s a great way to get around on your own schedule. An automatic rental car can go for as low €15 a day in the low season up to €45 a day in the higher seasons and will ensure you get to all the best places in Italy. Knowing how to drive a manual car will often get you cheaper rates in Europe. If you’re traveling as a group it is worth your while to hire a car for your trip.

We traveled around Italy for one week and paid about $300 for a car rental in Italy, which was a pretty decent deal in my opinion! I generally like to check comparison sites so I can get the best prices. My favorites to look at are:

Rental CarsAutoEuropeDiscover Car Hire

Dolomites
Pizza in the Dolomites!

Where to Stay in Italy?


Airbnb

Every time we visit Italy we stay in at least one Airbnb. Most apartment rentals in Italy feel very Italian and staying in someone’s home can enhance your travel experiences. To feel more at home, we use Airbnb you can check out some tips and read more about getting an Airbnb coupon code hereOr take this coupon for your first stay!

Get Your Coupon Here!

The Gritti Palace, Venice

This hotel is arguably the best hotel in all of Italy. It is an institution and occupies one of the best spots on the Grand Canal in Venice. The palace is situated directly across from Santa Maria Della Salute one of Venice’s greatest churches and an incredible sight. Via private jetty, guests can avoid the tourist crowds on their way to the hotel.

Visitors will have a hard time finding what to draw their attention to in the sumptuous palace because even the frescoed floors are masterful works of art. Once you’re able to lift your eye off the floor you’ll find marble-clad walls, priceless paintings, and original antiques from the palace of a former Doge of Venice. There is hardly a better or more fitting place to experience Venice than from The Gritti Palace. Our first time in Venice we even tracked down the hotel to see the famous interior.

Agoda.com Booking.com Hotels.com

Villa Cora, Florence

With all of the bells and whistles of a modern hotel, this new-comer on the Italian hotel scene places guests in their very own Tuscan dreams. The centerpiece here the 19th-century villa constructed by Baron Oppenheim, one of the principal financiers of the Suez Canal.

The villa is Italian decadence with parquet floors, large mirrors, crystal chandeliers and a whole series of reception rooms. Guest at Villa Cora will not have to worry about being pampered because the hotel also houses one of the best spas in Florence offering a wide range of services.

The services and amenities do not stop there with a free shuttle bus that will pick you up anywhere in the city and an outdoor heated pool open year round. In the summer, the rooftop buzzes with guests and outside visitors at the champagne bar there to enjoy the warm Tuscan evenings.

Agoda.com Booking.comHotels.com

Two Week Italy Itinerary - Must See Places Milano

Plan and Pack for Italy


Book a Tour!

Sometimes it’s nice when others do all the travel planning!

ViatorGetYourGuide


Travel Insurance

We don’t travel without travel insurance and neither should you. You never know what can happen in a foreign country and it’s best to be prepared. World Nomads provides good short term coverage

SafetyWing is perfect for digital nomads. See our full review here!

Check Rates


Airbnb Coupon Code
Accommodation in Italy

To feel more at home we use Airbnb you can check out some tips and read more about getting an Airbnb coupon code hereOr just take this coupon for your first stay!

Get Coupon!


Italy Guide Book
Guide Book

Sometimes it’s nice just to have a real book in your hands when traveling. We recommend picking up a Lonely Planet to get you through the wireless nights.

Get Guide Book


Carry On Backpack

You’re going to need something to carry your belongings in while you’re traveling around Italy. Even if you’re not doing extensive hikes you need at least something for carry on and day trips.

Carry On Travel Backpack


Beach Packing List Sunglasses
Sunglasses

Make sure to protect your eyes from the sun in Italy. There are a lot of options for sunglasses and everyone should own at least a pair. It’s best to make sure they do have UV protection for the health of your eyes.

We made our first investment in quality polarized sunglasses with a pair of SMITH Optics Lowdown 2. Truthfully, not everyone needs to invest $150 in a pair of sunglasses, but they do make a huge difference from the crappy $10 ones.

See Sunglasses


Traveling in Italy
Sunscreen

Skin cancer is for real, even in Italy! Don’t forget your SPF when traveling around Italy. We recommend ordering some online before leaving the house as you will need it underneath the sun in the summer.

We highly recommend getting an eco friendly sun cream that does not contain harmful chemicals.

Purchase Sunscreen


AllBirds
Travel Shoes

If you’re wondering what travel necessities to bring to Italy then good walking shoes should be your top concern.

I love my Merrell Moab Ventilators and Allbirds for travel, I’ve been going strong in them for two years! Check out my other recommendations on women’s shoes, and the best men’s travel shoes.

Men’s Allbirds Wool RunnersWomens Allbirds Wool Runners


Things to Know before you head to Italy
Activewear

There are many outdoor activities in Italy (Dolomites, volcanoes, and hilltop towns), that require some activewear to enjoy. So, when you’re wondering what to wear in Italy consider packing at least one active outfit. Not to mention all of the carbs you’re going to need to burn off!

My favorite brand of activewear is AlalaAlala makes top quality yoga pants, sports bras, and comfortable tops.  If you’re planning on doing a hike in the Dolomites make sure to get a good hiking backpack.

Alala


Best Down Jackets
Down Jacket

I ALWAYS have a down jacket with me when I’m traveling in the winter, fall, or even spring, even in Italy. They aren’t just good for hikes, but doing anything outside. Mine came in particularly useful in the Dolomites.

Down jackets pack up light and small so there is no reason NOT to have one in your bag. Seriously it could save your life in a bad situation. We wrote a whole post on our favorites (hint –Feathered Friends, Arc’Teryx Cerium LT Hooded JacketPatagonia Down SweaterREI Coop Down Jacket)

Feathered Friends


Packable Rain Jacket - Arcteryx Women’s Beta SL Gore-Tex Jacket
Goretex Rain Jacket

We’re building up a collection of shell jackets. We always carry one in our pack and they’ve come in handy a number of times. They are lightweight, durable, packable, waterproof, and windproof and really a great travel rain jacket. We have a bunch of different shell jackets after several years, but my favorite right now is from Arc’teryx.

Any jacket can do the job, but the top dollar ones will hold up and really help in inclement weather.

Arc’teryx


Traveling in Italy
Kindle Paperwhite

I love real books, but for traveling it can be easier to carry a lighter and more compact item like a Kindle. Plus, then you can download new books on the go!

Kindle Paperwhite


Best Travel Water Bottles
Waterbottle

Please consider purchasing a travel water bottle before your trip! We hate to see one time use plastic bottles ending up in the ocean. The tap water is so good here – seriously please don’t be one of those tourist that buys plastic water bottles in Italy. It’s a waste of money and plastic!

Grayl Waterbottle


What to wear in Italy
Sun Hat

It gets sunny in Italy, and unless you’re walking around museums you will be outside most of the day. Make sure to protect your face with a nice sun hat.

Sun Hat


Traveling in Italy
Delsey 24″ Spinner

Delsey makes my favorite hard side luggage and after five years of travel around the world, they have yet to let me down. Plus their bags look incredibly stylish, which is essential in countries like Italy. Many of their bags have heavy duty wheels, TSA accepted locks and two full packing compartments with tie-down straps and a zippered divider. If you want something different, check out our other favorite carry on luggage pieces.

Delsey Top Sellers


Best Travel Towel - REI Micro Lite towel
Travel Towel

Most hotels will provide you with a towel, but they often aren’t suitable or allowed on the Italian beaches. I like to travel with a microfiber towel because they are light and fold up small, and they also don’t cling on to sand our dirt. Here are a few of our favorite travel towels.

Travel Towel


Traveling in Italy
Adapter

Remember that Italy uses both the  “Type L ” Italian adapter and the Europlug. Many adapters are interchangeable, so make sure you find a good one like the one I have to keep you charged.

Get an Adapter


THANKS FOR READING!

The World Pursuit - Subscribe

Join Our Email List!


About the Author

Natasha

Facebook

Natasha is a five-foot blonde that believes she was made short so she could fit in air, train, car, and bus seats comfortably. She believes in watching every single movie nominated for an Oscar and loves all animals. Natasha has a passion for environmentally friendly and sustainable travel. Natasha recently made a move to Canada and resides near Banff National Park in Alberta and loves new adventures in the mountains. Natasha's favorite countries are Italy, Iceland, Greece, Japan, Mozambique, and South Africa.

Check Out These Posts

Travel in Italy

Travel Quote Inspiration

Tips For Your Next Trip

Find Your Next Trip

Accommodation

Pack Your Bags

What Do You Want To Do?

Last Updated on

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *